Archive for the ‘Kathmandu’ Category

ECS Nepal in 2017

in Kathmandu, published, writing

Since joining ECS Nepal as editor in January of 2017, I’ve done a lot more writing for the magazine, rather too much to post it all here. When I have time, though, I’ll still be linking to work published – like the article below, one of my recent favourites.

http://ecs.com.np/features/nepali-medicine-man

Celebrating Thamel

in Kathmandu, writing

Yesterday a hundred and fifty or so people gathered in the newly opened Fairfield Marriott for the launch of ECS’s May Issue – a special one all about Thamel. It turned out to be a wonderfully fluid and animated event. Speakers included Fire And Ice’s Anna Maria Forgione, Karna Shakya from Kathmandu Guest House, and Akur Narsingh Rana, born in Thamel and now 89 years of age. They shared their memories and thoughts on what Thamel means to them–a little bit of living history.

 

The Mo:Mo Series — Number 4

in Food, Kathmandu, mo: mo, mo:mo series, Nepali dishes

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So are these top-notch mo:mos? Not exactly. They’re decent though, and the the mix of the two sauces provided (regular tomato and extra chilli) is pretty tasty.

What does make them awesome and fun is that they come from this cute stand out in the parking lot of the Maharajgunj branch of the Bhat Bhateni Supermarket. In case it’s too small to read in the picture, the line on the bottom of the food stall reads, verbatim:

So Long As You have Mo:Mo In Your Mouth, You Have Solved All Questions For The Time Being.

I really can’t argue with that. In fact, it could practically be my motto.

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Truth

in daily life, earthquake, Kathmandu

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Sometimes truth comes via the most unlikely avenues – case in point, the above, seen outside the Kathmandu Guest House, which has recently undergone some post-earthquake renovations. I admit I’m not big on change, being more inclined to love the old, ramshackle things and mourn for what is gone. But it’s true – change is the only constant. I only hope it’s all for the better, as this seems to be.

 

 

376

in daily life, earthquake, Kathmandu

Yesterday morning the house rattled; a small surprise. I haven’t felt an aftershock in some time now. While it was a small tremor–only 4.3–it’s a little worrying that its epicentre was Kalimati, right in the heart of Kathmandu. According to the National Seismological Center, 376 aftershocks measuring above 4 on the Richter scale have been recorded since April 25th. And of course that doesn’t count the hundreds of little ones that come in under 4. I join everyone else in the country in hoping and praying that the worst is well behind us, not still to come. New data released last week, which you can read about in this BBC article here, isn’t exactly cheerful, but everywhere I go I see optimism, hard work, rebuilding. To quote the phrase I’ve seen being used everywhere from street art to billboard advertisements: We Will Rise Again.

Time to Stand Tall

in Food, Kathmandu, Nepal, restaurants

Friday stand tall

… that’s what’s on the cover of the first issue of Friday! to come out since the earthquake on April 25th. It’s normally a weekly, but it’ll take a while to get back into a regular publishing groove, so this one is still on newsstands. It’s got some great photos of historical sites as well as memories and post-earthquake thoughts from a wide variety of sources, so if you’re in Kathmandu it’s well worth picking up a copy. In the interests of full disclosure 🙂 I should tell you there’s an article of mine in there as well, found online here, about restaurants reopening after the quake. I was asked to write it about ten days after the first one, but the second quake pushed the printing later, so it didn’t come out until after that. It touches on a subject close to my heart–the power of food to nurture, comfort and heal, even in the aftermath of terrible tragedy.

 

 

The new normal

in daily life, earthquake, Kathmandu

I’ve been having trouble sleeping lately, and it’s often 4 or 5 am with the sky just beginning to lighten when I can finally drop off. Yesterday I didn’t fall asleep until past 3, and later found out I’d slept soundly through a 5.5 tremor that happened at about 7:30 am.

Later in the day, I told a friend it worried me that I’d been able to sleep right through it. I might have been in danger.

“Don’t worry, it was only a 5.5,” she replied.

“That’s true.”

A few seconds later it hit us: who could have imagine a month ago that we’d be sitting here calmly dismissing an earthquake that was 5.5 on the Richter scale?

As another friend of mine so aptly put it, this is our “new normal.”

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