Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

The Mo:Mo Series – Number 1

in Food, mo: mo, Nepali dishes

After the mo:mo picture I posted here recently, I got to thinking about the amazing variety of mo:mo available here in Nepal — there are so many different shapes, sauces, and styles. I love recording them, so I think I’m going to post some mo:mo pictures I’ve been taking (and eating, of course) with a little information about the place I had them and how they were. Here goes.

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These are the chicken mo:mo at the Dokhaima Cafe, Patan Dhoka, Patan. I’ve had these often and they’re outstanding — juicy and best of all, that green sauce? It’s a chilli-mint concoction that’s fresh and delicious, and I always need a refill. Note that the middle orangey sauce is pretty good too (the top one is pretty much lethal chilli).

Fresh from the garden

in daily life, gardening, Vegetables

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I know, I know, they don’t look like much. But they’re nearly the last of the green beans grown fresh in a blue container just outside my door. There have been bigger harvests, which I was much too busy enjoying to remember to photograph. There’s not many there, but they will add a little crunch to tonight’s chicken salad. Yum.

Today’s Lunch Dahl-Bhat

in daily life, Food, restaurants

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Today I enjoyed lunch with a friend at the Dokhaima Cafe, Patan Dhoka, Patan. Traditional Nepali daily fare–but extra delicious. From the top, around the rice: a crispy poppadum, dry chicken curry, alu achar (potato pickle), thin fried slices of bitter gourd, and in the bowl on the top right, yellow lentils.

 

Nepali Mo:Mo

in Food, mo: mo

 

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Jhol mo:mo (chicken) at GG Machaan’s, Jhamsikhel, Lalitpur. These were a 7/10. I love jhol mo:mo and next time I want to try their buff ones.

I’m writing for a new Nepali news site!

in Food, writing

Last month I became a regular contributor to the english edition of a new Nepali news portal, OnlineKhabar.

It’s a really great site that features a lot of interesting articles from a local perspective, and they contacted me after seeing my work with ECS and Friday.

I’m really thrilled to be working with them — two of my pieces have already gone up – links are below – do let me know what you think!

Even with so many eateries to choose from, Kathmandu’s local fare (and momos!) still hold up

After the Nepal quake, caring, and food

 

A Simple Curry of Leafy Greens and Soybeans

in Food, recipes, Vegetables

A few weeks ago a wonderful friend — who is always trying to feed me — gave me a container to take home. It was full of a delicious and unusual “spinach” and soybean curry. And then when the neighborhood lady who regularly shows up at my gate with little bits of vegetables to sell  came with a bag of greens and soybeans, I decided to try to recreate it. She is really friendly and what she brings is always so cheap, I pretty much buy whatever it is, even if I have no real plan of how to use it. Actual spinach is rarely found in Nepal — rather, all greens are called saag, and can be the leafy part of pretty much anything edible. I think what she brought me was mustard greens, but I’m not completely sure. You can use any green leafy vegetable you have to hand, but this is best with smaller and slightly more bitter greens. The most time consuming part of making this was shelling the soybeans – if you can get them preshelled where you are, more power to you. This is a lighter curry, a kind you often get here in Nepal, as opposed the heavier, saucier type some people might be used to thinking of as a curry. The original dish had no potato, but I had one lonely one on my counter that needed to be used and I like potatoes in my curry so I added one – but you don’t have to.

A Simple Curry of Leafy Greens and Soybeans

500 grams/ 1 lb greens of your choice

250 grams/ 8 oz soybeans

1 medium red onion

3 – 4 cloves of garlic

2-3 plum tomatoes

1 medium potato

1 heaping teaspoon of cumin (jeera in Nepali)

pinch of cinnamon

several whole dried chilies, to taste (or chili flakes)

half a vegetable or chicken stock cube

salt to taste

oil for frying

Parboil the soybeans and shell them. This is best done while listening to an audiobook or watching TV so that you won’t notice how slowly the beans are accumulating. If you get too bored, boil twice the amount and eat half of them Japanese style (edamame) as you shell. 🙂

Wash the greens well to remove any grit and lose the roots, if there are any. Roughly chop if the leaves are large.

Chop the onions and garlic and fry for a minute or so. Add the cumin, salt, pinch of cinnamon and the dried chilies. If you don’t have whole ones, you can use a pinch of chili flakes.

Cut the potato into small cubes so it will cook quicker and let it fry with everything for a few minutes while you chop the tomatoes, then add them to the pan, and let everything cook together for a minute or two more. Then add the greens and soybeans and stir well, and crumble in the half a stock cube. Cover and let cook over medium-low heat until the potatoes (if using) and greens are done — it depends what kind you are using, some greens can be rather tough. You might need to add a splash of water to loosen things up and help everything cook, but see how much liquid your tomatoes and greens give off first.

I served this over brown rice and topped it with a fried egg, but it would also be good with rotis or other flatbread. This is enough for two people if you eat it as a main meal like I did, or four people as a side dish. It reheats well and I happily enjoyed it for several days.

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Time to Stand Tall

in Food, Kathmandu, Nepal, restaurants

Friday stand tall

… that’s what’s on the cover of the first issue of Friday! to come out since the earthquake on April 25th. It’s normally a weekly, but it’ll take a while to get back into a regular publishing groove, so this one is still on newsstands. It’s got some great photos of historical sites as well as memories and post-earthquake thoughts from a wide variety of sources, so if you’re in Kathmandu it’s well worth picking up a copy. In the interests of full disclosure 🙂 I should tell you there’s an article of mine in there as well, found online here, about restaurants reopening after the quake. I was asked to write it about ten days after the first one, but the second quake pushed the printing later, so it didn’t come out until after that. It touches on a subject close to my heart–the power of food to nurture, comfort and heal, even in the aftermath of terrible tragedy.

 

 

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